Population Ecology - survivorship curves and r- and K-selected species

Created March 2020, Offline version here
Video by Paul Anderson, also on his website Bozeman Science.

    The maximum number of organisms sustainable within an ecosystem is referred to as the .
    An ecologist is studying a population of marine iguanas on the Galapagos Islands. She needs to figure out the by measuring the number of iguanas. One of the characteristics of a population is its , which is a measurement of the population size in a given unit or area.
    Generally, species have few offspring and provide a lot of parental care. The population graph of these species will increase and then they stabilize due to a carrying capacity.
    However, species typically have lots of offspring that don't provide a lot of parental care.
    Humans fall under a survivorship curve. The population size is greater at the beginning when humans are born, but then the human population starts to decrease throughout their lifetime -mainly at the end.
    Species of survivorship curves demonstrate a gradual and steady decline in the population size because the species dies off at a constant rate throughout their lifetime.
    The intrinsic growth rate value indicates the natural rate at which a population grows. The intrinsic growth rate can be found by dividing by the .
    The size of an exponentially growing population can be calculated for any particular time by using the following equation .
    Factors that are not dependent on the number of organisms in a given area are referred to as limiting factors, such as drought, fires, floods, and earthquakes.
    A Great Flood occured in the Great Forest near the Great Valley. Before the Great Flood, the white tail deer population was flourishing with an intrinsic growth rate of 0.2, resulting in a/an .
    However, after the Great Flood, the population experiences a carrying capacity (K) value of 1,509, resulting in a/an .
    A Great Flood occured in the Great Forest near the Great Valley. Before the Great Flood, the white tail deer population was flourishing with an intrinsic growth rate of 0.1, resulting in a/an .
    However, after the Great Flood, the population experiences a carrying capacity (K) value of 100, resulting in a/an .
    Ten years ago, an ecologist in Africa observed an elephant population of 121 elephants. After analyzing the population for 10 years, he determined that the intrinsic growth rate is 0.2. During the fifth year of his observation, the elephant population was . (Round answer to a whole number)
    A scientist in the northern tundra is observing two separate arctic hare populations. One of the distribution patterns of the hare population is evenly dispersed ( ).
    However, the other arctic hare distribution pattern is dispersed with no predictable pattern ( )
    The size (N) of a population is analyzed by the number of in that particular population.
    Generally, in a predator-prey relationship the rise and fall in the population follows the rise and fall in the population.
    Things that can lower the density and the growth rate of a population (whether by overcrowdedness or by chance) are referred to as .
    There are two species of cranes (species ‘A’ and ‘B’) that live on two different isolated islands near the Pacific Ocean. Species ‘A’ dwindled after experiencing water scarcity due to water pollution over the years, resulting in .
    The population of species ‘B’ regressed after a landslide hit the isolated island, resulting in a .